Problem:

The handle for this cheap plastic laundry basket broke. We’ve been carrying it using the smaller holes for grip on that side. This is the second side to fail for this laundry basket. 

A new laundry basket is like ~$15...

I’m trying to learn this amazing program Shapr3D. I picked up a newer iPad that is compatible with the Apple Pencil which is required to use this app. This app only works on a certain list of iPads. Since I usually shoot for super complex projects rather than simple ones, I figured this would be a great way to slow down and learn product design, manufacturing, and QA for a non-technical product. 

I found Fusion 360, Rhino, 3d Studio Max, Maya, Blender, and Sketch harder for me to focus on learning as there’s so many key combos, menus, etc. I wanted a product that focused on the needs and did it where I felt less overwhelmed. Shapr3D so far has been pretty great that way.

Solution:

Design and print a handle that I can hook on to the existing laundry basket. 

I’m still getting used to using my caliper and measuring for design.

 

V1: Design

V1: Print

Above you can see the “supports” I used. These allow you to print a supporting tower that should be easy to pull away after the print is done leaving the empty space you intended. Otherwise you’d be printing overhangs in mid air and depending on if your printer is dialed in to perfect settings and temperatures is a hit or miss. 

You can get soluble filament (plastic used for printing) that dissolves in water. These supports will not leave as many marks and help in hard to pull out locations where supports are needed (under an arm of a figure, between fingers, etc)

V1: QA / Testing

My findings:

  1. I didn’t fillet the inside edges allowing the straight edges have a lot more focused force / load on edges causing part of the reason of the snap. 
  2. I kept the infill % (how filled with filament vs hollow it is) low so I could save filament + see if my measurements were correct. Having a low infill % inside for the important edges would allow for greater strength.
  3. The thickness on the bottom + height of the clip that hooks into the other side could be longer for more stability + strength. 
  4. My measurement of each clip was off as I needed a wider handle to hook into the center of the oval better. 

V2: Updated Design

  1. Inside edges filet / rounded.
  2. Updated infill to 90% and used the 3D Honeycomb pattern for the bottom area where the main load is (the hook area). I chose the 3D Honeycomb pattern based on reading this wonderful post which would allow for greater strength. The green box is a modifier which tells PrusaSlicer (the slicing software I’m using) that anywhere that green box overlaps with red print use the special modifier settings. For that location you can see the second image in the bottom right showing the % and pattern. 
  3. The thickness on the bottom & height of the clip that hooks into the other side was made longer & thicker for more stability & strength. 
  4. My measurement of each clip was off as I needed a wider handle to hook into the center of the oval better. 

V2: QA / Testing

Success!! The handle is the correct size and so far is holding up a full load of laundry! I printed another one for the other side and asked Amber to keep me in the loop if anything happens to it.

For now…I’d consider this design a success!